Arbeits-, Organisations- und Marktpsychologie

Forschungsberichte

Hier finden Sie Forschungsberichte (Reports) der letzten Jahre

2014

Konradt, U., Garbers, Y., Hoch, J. & Ellwart, T. (2014, December).  Evidence for the dispersed leadership theory in teams: A policy-capturing study (Working Paper 14). Kiel: Institute of Psychology.

 

Abstract and PDF

Based on the Dispersed Leadership Theory in Teams, we examined the simultaneousinfluence of three factors on team members’ attitudes and behavior: (1) interactionalleadership carried out by leaders, (2) team leadership performed by team members, and (3)structural leadership exerted by work and organizational structures. Results from two policycapturingstudies revealed that structural, interactional and team leadership simultaneouslyaffect an individual’s behavior in terms of task behavior, task performance and commitment.Results also indicated that the need for dispersed leadership was particularly high insituations with high task uncertainty and where the learning of new task behavior wasrequired. Results from Study 2 further demonstrated the positive relationship betweeninteractional leadership, team leadership, and structural leadership with team members’ taskperformance and commitment. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for theDispersed Leadership Theory in Teams which showed a way to structure and extend futureleadership research.

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2012

Hauschildt, K. & Konradt, U. (2012, February).  A Conceptual Framework of Self-leadership in Teams (Working Paper 13). Kiel: Institute of Psychology.

Abstract and PDF

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on self-leadership in teams; extend self-leadership theory by focusing on the underlying processes in teams and moderating team context variables; and relate self-leadership in teams to a set of differentiated member work role behaviors including proficiency, adaptivity, and proactivity. After a review of research on individual and team members' self-leadership, the underlying motivational processes of individual self-leadership in teams are examined. Building on these, moderating team context variables on the self-leadership work role-performance relationship are proposed. A summarizing multilevel framework is presented which relates self-leadership in teams to a differentiated set of team member work role behaviors including proficiency, adaptivity, and proactivity. Additionally, motivational processes are proposed which mediate self-leadership-behavior relationships. Finally, research implications are discussed. The framework extends current theories by (1) examining individual self-leadership in teams, (2) using a comprehensive and differentiated set of team member work role performance, and (3) applying an individual-level model of motivation in teams to explain effects of self-leadership in teams.

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2011 - April

Wiedow, A. (2011, April). Understanding Direct and Indirect Effects of Team Process Improvement: A Conceptual Framework (Working Paper 12). Kiel: Institute of Psychology.

Abstract and PDF

Team process improvement, a key factor to enhance and sustain team as well as company success, is known as the continuous reflection and adaptation of team work behaviors. In this article a conceptual framework which models team process improvement is presented. After defining the concept its two-dimensional structure and its relation to team performance, the explanatory value of collective cognition and affective-motivational variables acting as mediators, and team characteristics as moderators (i.e. task interdependence and the degree of virtuality) are derived. Finally, implications for research and management of process improvement in teams follow.

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2011 - March

Konradt, U. (2011, March). The Dispersed Leadership Theory in Teams: Model and Empirical Evidence (Working Paper 11). Kiel: Institute of Psychology.

Abstract and PDF

This paper addresses how leadership can be conceptualized in times of dispersed and team working structures. The Dispersed Leadership Theory in Teams proposes three distinguishing types of leadership, which include interactional leadership exerted by leaders; team leadership provided by team members; and structural leadership influenced by work and organizational factors (i.e., task, organizational structures, and customers). It is assumed that these three types of leadership simultaneously exert influence on follower’s attitudes and behaviors. We outline the theory, review empirical evidence based on the model and discuss the strengths and limitations. In conclusion, we discuss the emerging topics for future studies.

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